Thomas Hesketh

#5726, b. 1406, d. 1458

ChartsRoger FitzReinfield Descendants

Major Life Events

     Thomas Hesketh was born in 1406.1 He married Sibyl Lawrence, daughter of Robert Lawrence and Margaret Holden.2 Thomas died in 1458.2,1

Child of Thomas and Sibyl Lawrence

Narrative

     Thomas was also known as [Sir] Thomas Hesketh.

Citations

  1. [S272] William Farrer and J. Brownbill editors Victoria History of Lancastershire, Volume VI, page 121.
  2. [S172] Schuyler Lawrence, Communication to NEHGS.

Richard Ratcliffe1

#5727

ChartsRoger FitzReinfield Descendants

Major Life Events

     Richard Ratcliffe married Ann Lawrence, daughter of Robert Lawrence and Margaret Holden.2

Citations

  1. (of Wimbersley and Essex), Lord of the manors of Routhworth and Dillicar, co. Westmoreland.
  2. [S172] Schuyler Lawrence, Communication to NEHGS.

Edmund Lawrence1

#5728, b. say 1310, d. 1381

Ashton Hall
Probably built by Edmund Lawrence
Relationships4th great-grandson of Roger FitzReinfrid
6th great-grandfather of Robert Lawrence
ChartsRoger FitzReinfield Descendants
Descent from Roger FitzReinfrid to Robert Lawrence
FatherJohn Lawrence b. s 1275, d. a 1348
MotherElizabeth Holt

Major Life Events

     Edmund Lawrence was born say 1310. He married first Alice de Cuerdale, daughter of John de Cuerdale and Dionisia ?.2 He married second Agnes de Washington, daughter of Robert de Washington and Margaret ?, circa 1369.3,4 Edmund died in 1381.5

Family of Edmund and Alice de Cuerdale

Children of Edmund and Agnes de Washington

Narrative

     In 1534, John Brockholes of Claughton said he heard John Lawrence, a blind man, say that Edmund, his great grandfather married Robert's Washington's daughter and heir. He had married Alice daughter of John de Cuerdale. She died in 1353 and it does not appear that there was any issue.6

     Edmund's second wife, Agnes, daughter and heiress of Robert de Washington, Lord of the manor of Scotforth, brought him other lands and also, notably, moities of the manors of Carnforth and Carleton. Edmund had no issue by his first wife, Alice, and the marriage terminated in a divorce.7

     Edmund was the second Squire of Ashton. In 1338 he held, with his parents, the Stapleton part of the manor of Ashton for life.8

     In 1345, he had been commissioned with his uncle William to investigate wastes in the manor of Wyresdale.7 In 1348, John Franceys dismised certain of this lands, etc., to Edmund for life at the rent of a rose for six years and then 100s. Agnes, the daughter of John Franceys married Lambert de Wyresdale and they quit-claimed to Edmund in 1366.9

     In 1350 Edmund held burgages in Pennystreet, Lancaster.8

     In 1357 he made a feoffment of lands in Lancaster, Skerton, Ellel, Ashton, and Preeshall10 and in 1373 it was found that he held for life three plough-lands of Thomas de Stapleton by a rent of 20 marks.11 In 1358 he was pardoned, after paying 100 shillings, for acquiring a life interest in the Irish Manors of Baliogary, Lough and Casterling without license.8 Also in 1358 he held land in Preesall.12 In 1361 he was pardoned, for service in France, of taking 200 in silver from John Darcy's house.8

     He was Knight of the Shire in 1362 when he and Matthew de Rixton being deputies of the sheriff, concealed the election writ and returned themselves as knights of the shire. This return was later quashed.13

     In 1363 was receiver of Queen Philippa's monies in Ireland. In 1367 he was attorney in England for the Prior of St. Mary's, Lancaster. In 1368 he was commissioner of Array to choose 100 archers in Lancashire.8

     In 1373 he held for life three plough-lands of Thomas de Stapleton by a rent of 20 marks.13 He was the Stapleton tenant as Scotforth as in Ashton in 1793.14 In 1375 he released his life interest in the Irish Manors and in that of Dunmow.8

     In 1376, he held for life fisheries and ridings in Ashton together with a fourth part of the manor, of the heirs of Thomas de Thweng, deceased, by rent of 13s. 4d.13

     In 1378 he purchased all the rights of Thomas de Molyneux in the marriage of Richard, son of Sir William de Moylneux of Sefton.15

     In 1381/2, evidently shortly before Edmund's death, John de Oxcliffe granted an estate in Overton to Edmund. John de Oxcliffe had held the estate as trustee, given him in 1374, from Adam, son of William de Lancaster, that William held in the right of his wife Blanche.16

     Edmund held ten burgages, two messuages, 30 acres of land, etc., by a rent of 6s. 8d. of the duke in free burgage at his death in 1381.17 His son Robert was 10 years old. His will names Agnes his wife, Robert his son and heir, and other children. What holding was retained in Ashton is not clear, but in the reigns of Henry IV and Henry VI certain lands, in later times called 'Lawrence lands,' were demised to the family by the Methams.13 The trustees of Edmund granted to his son John, lands in Skerton and Heysham.18

     The Manor of Ashton figures in the Doomsday Book of 1086. However, it is three more centuries beore the first physical evidence of its long history is revealed in the shape of the Pele tower that forms the southern flank of the mondern Lancaster Golf Club Clubhouse. The tower certainly dates from the fourteenth century and was possibly build by Edmund Lawrence who died in 1381. He was a descendant of the first recorded owners of the Manor of Ashton, the family of de Lancastre, barons of Kendal. His wife, Agnes is even more interesting.19

     Pele towers were fortified dwellings virtually unique to the Border region with Scotland, intended to protect their occupants against raiding parties moving south in search of booty. They were constructed in a manner to deprive their assailants of any easy means of entry. Their windows were of minimal size, small, rectangular apertures. The original Hall was built according to a standard design, one that was popular with wealthy landowners seeking a secure dwelling place in an insecure world. There were three stories. The ground floor is vaulted to provide stability. It was usually windowless and was used for storage purposes and to shelter the animals. The first floor contained the main hall and kitchen, and the top floor the living and sleeping quarters. The battlemented roof was flat in order to provide a stable lookout form which to launch missiles and fire arrows upon attackers. The four turrets were set diagonally to maximise the chances of scoring direct hits.20

Citations

  1. 2nd Squire of Ashton.
  2. [S272] William Farrer and J. Brownbill editors Victoria History of Lancastershire, Volume VI, page 301.
  3. [S272] William Farrer and J. Brownbill editors Victoria History of Lancastershire, Volume VIII, page 168.
  4. [S2379] "Parentage of William de Lancaster."
  5. [S272] William Farrer and J. Brownbill editors Victoria History of Lancastershire, Volume VIII, page 39.
  6. [S272] William Farrer and J. Brownbill editors Victoria History of Lancastershire, Volume VIII, page 51.
  7. [S172] Schuyler Lawrence, Communication to NEHGS.
  8. [S173] Schuyler Lawrence, The Lawrences: Squires of Ashton, Lancs.
  9. [S272] William Farrer and J. Brownbill editors Victoria History of Lancastershire, Volume VIII, page 134.
  10. [S272] William Farrer and J. Brownbill editors Victoria History of Lancastershire, Volume VIII, page 61.
  11. [S272] William Farrer and J. Brownbill editors Victoria History of Lancastershire, Volume VIII, pages 51, 52.
  12. [S272] William Farrer and J. Brownbill editors Victoria History of Lancastershire, Volume VII, page 260.
  13. [S272] William Farrer and J. Brownbill editors Victoria History of Lancastershire, Volume VIII, page 52.
  14. [S272] William Farrer and J. Brownbill editors Victoria History of Lancastershire, Volume VIII, page 56.
  15. [S272] William Farrer and J. Brownbill editors Victoria History of Lancastershire, Volume III, page 69.
  16. [S272] William Farrer and J. Brownbill editors Victoria History of Lancastershire, Volume VIII, page 62.
  17. [S272] William Farrer and J. Brownbill editors Victoria History of Lancastershire, Volumen VIII, pages 39, 61.
  18. [S272] William Farrer and J. Brownbill editors Victoria History of Lancastershire, Volume VIII, page 60.
  19. [S871] J. H. Shennan, A History of Lancaster Golf Club, pages 41, 42.
  20. [S871] J. H. Shennan, A History of Lancaster Golf Club, page 42.

Agnes de Washington

#5729, d. after 1406

Relationship6th great-grandmother of Robert Lawrence
ChartsRoger FitzReinfield Descendants
Descent from Roger FitzReinfrid to Robert Lawrence
FatherRobert de Washington
MotherMargaret ?

Major Life Events

     Agnes de Washington married Edmund Lawrence, son of John Lawrence and Elizabeth Holt, circa 1369.1,2 Agnes died after 1406.3

Children of Agnes and Edmund Lawrence

Narrative

     In 1406 Simon, formerly a servant of Robert de Washington, released all his claims to lands in Bolton to Agnes.3

     Agnes de Washington was a member of a family originally from Durham, which established itself in north Lancashire during the fourteenth century. In the sixteenth century they moved south to Northampton, and later westward to Virginia. In 1789 George Washington was elected the first President of the United States of America. Agnes de Washington, once the mistress of Ashton Hall, was unquestionably a kinswoman of the great founding father.4

     The parentage of William de Lancaster, lord of Kendal, by George Washington, states that Agnes was the granddaughter and ultimately the sole heiress of Robert de Washington, M. P. for Westmorland in 1300, and his wife, Joan de Strickland.2 However, I believe she was the great-granddaughter of Robert Washington and Joan de Strickland. A lineage chart in the club house at the Lancaster Golf Course which is built onto the original Ashton Hall, shows Agnes as a daughter of Robert de Washington and Margaret. This Robert de Washington was probably the son of Robert de Washington (son of Robert de Washington and Joan de Strickland) and his wife Agnes.

Citations

  1. [S272] William Farrer and J. Brownbill editors Victoria History of Lancastershire, Volume VIII, page 168.
  2. [S2379] "Parentage of William de Lancaster."
  3. [S272] William Farrer and J. Brownbill editors Victoria History of Lancastershire, Volume VIII, page 134.
  4. [S871] J. H. Shennan, A History of Lancaster Golf Club, page 42.

James Lawrence

#5731

Relationships5th great-grandson of Roger FitzReinfrid
5th great-granduncle of Robert Lawrence
ChartsRoger FitzReinfield Descendants
FatherEdmund Lawrence b. s 1310, d. 1381
MotherAgnes de Washington d. a 1406

Major Life Events

     James died without issue.

William Lawrence

#5732

Relationships5th great-grandson of Roger FitzReinfrid
5th great-granduncle of Robert Lawrence
ChartsRoger FitzReinfield Descendants
FatherEdmund Lawrence b. s 1310, d. 1381
MotherAgnes de Washington d. a 1406

Major Life Events

     William died without issue.

John Lawrence1

#5733, d. after 1432

Relationships5th great-grandson of Roger FitzReinfrid
5th great-granduncle of Robert Lawrence
ChartsRoger FitzReinfield Descendants
FatherEdmund Lawrence b. s 1310, d. 1381
MotherAgnes de Washington d. a 1406

Major Life Events

     John Lawrence married Marjery ?.2 John died after 1432.

Child of John and Marjery ?

Narrative

     The trustees of Edmund granted to his son John, lands in Skerton and Heysham. In 1420, the archdeacon of Richmond licensed the oratories of John Lawrence and Margery his wife at Lancaster, Poulton, and Scales.3

     John was a Member of Parliament in 1419. In 1413 and 1432 he was bailiff of Bucklow Hundred in Cheshire.

Citations

  1. (of Skerton and Heysham.)
  2. [S172] Schuyler Lawrence, Communication to NEHGS.
  3. [S272] William Farrer and J. Brownbill editors Victoria History of Lancastershire, Volume VIII, page 60.

John Lawrence1

#5734, b. say 1275, d. after 1348

Lawrence Arms
Relationships3rd great-grandson of Roger FitzReinfrid
7th great-grandfather of Robert Lawrence
ChartsRoger FitzReinfield Descendants
Descent from Roger FitzReinfrid to Robert Lawrence
FatherLawrence de Lancaster b. s 1250, d. a 1317

Major Life Events

     John Lawrence was born say 1275. He married Elizabeth Holt.2,3 John died after 1348.

Children of John and Elizabeth Holt

Narrative

     John Lawrence was the first Squire of Ashton and the first to use the surname Lawrence. John was a Member of Parliment in 1301 for Lancaster.4

     Richard, son of William the Cook, gave lands to Thomas, son of Richard de Stainall in 1315-16. This same Richard also gave land to John Lawrence and his wife Elizabeth.5 In 1323 John Lawrence held 30 acres in Skerton by a rent of 6s. 8d.6

     In 1331, John made a complaint of trespass on his fishery at Ashton. John in conjunction with Elizabeth his wife and Edmund their son held the Stapleton part of Ashton manor in 1338 for life. The family then or a little later obtained, apparently by marriage, the estate of the Gentyl and Washington families in Carleton, Scotforth, and elsewhere.7

     Also in 1331, he was holding lands in Lancaster and Lentworth from Robert de Holland.4

     Between 1318 and 1325 he was a juror in at least eight inquests.2

     In 1337, John Lawrence of Ashton obtained land in Stodday on Netherbaiske Brook from Robert son of Thomas son of Roger de Stodagh.7

     In 1338, John Lawrence in conjunction with Elizabeth his wife and Edmund their son held the Stableton part of Ashton for life. The family then or a little later obtained, apparently by marriage, the estate of Gentyl and Washington families in Carleton, Scotforth and elsewhere.7

     In 1346 he was a partner in a farm belonging to the Cockersand Abbey Estate4 and at an inquest was holding additional lands in Lancaster from the Earl.2 In 1346 he was paying the Earl 10d. annually for the harrowing, reaping, etc., due from 32 acres in Skerton.6

     Also in 1346, he held a half plough-land in Amounderness Hundred by the service of two crossbows. John de Hackinsall held a plough-land and a half and the Abbot of Cockersand held half a plough-land.8

     In 1347 John gave to John the Frereson and Joan his wife (who had sons John and Edmund) a burgage in St. Mary-gate upon Caldkeld Bank9 and was master of the manor of Ashton by a yearly fee of £22.4 In 1348 he was holding 5 acres in Skerton and Hackensall from the Duke4 and was a partner with his nephew, John Lawrence of Lancaster, in the milnfield in Lancaster.2

     In 1347 John Lawrence held the Coucy moieties of Ashton and Scotforth at a rent of £22.7

     In 1348-50, William de Heaton made a claim for messuages, etc., in Lonsdale against Thomas son of Marmaduke de Thweng, John Lawrence of Ashton, William de Washington, and Robert de Haldleghes.10

Ashton Hall

     Ashton Hall, the ancient seat of the Lawrences, is located about three miles to the south of the town of Lancaster, in northern Lancashire. It is picturesquely situated, commanding fine views of the estuary of the River Lune, and of Morecambe Bay, an extensive inlet of the Irish Sea. Ashton Hall is noted for the sylvan beauty of its spacious park, which is well diversified with hill and vale. The mansion is a large edifice, with many of the characteristics of an ancient baronial castle, having a square tower at one end, and numerous battlements, turrets, and machiocolations. Successive alterations and additions have been made at different epochs, in harmony with the medieval type of architecture. The oldest portion is probably from the fourteenth century. The interior contains a fine baronial hall.11

     In 1066 Ashton was one of three manors of Cliber, Machern and Gillemicheld and appears to have been accessed of two plough-lands. (The other two manors, Ellel and Scotforth, retained their connection to Ashton being held by the Lancaster family.) Afterwards, it was granted to Count Rogers of Poitori and a little later formed part of the lordship held by the Lancaster family, being held by knight's service. In the time of Henry II (1154-1189) William de Lancaster I granted half a plough-land to Gilbert de Ashton to hold by service of half a mark yearly. The second moiety wash shared or inherited by the families of Stableton and Metham, Thweng and Pedwarding, and appears to have been acquired by the Lawrence family of Lancaster.12

     In 1226, the Millfield at Ashton rendered 5s. a year to the king. in 1323 it was held by many free tenants, who in all paid 5s. to the earl. This Millfield contained 20 acres. Tenants were William and Randle le Gentyl and John and Alice Lawrence.13

     The free tenants in 1301 were Roger de Slene; another who had a messuage and 5 acres for a rent of 20d; Lawrence son of Thomas who rendered 6s. 8d. yearly; John de Ashton who held a messuage and 4 oxgangs of land and paid 6s.8d. rent; and Randle who paid 7d. In 1292 Gervase de Ashton claimed land against a Lawrence de Ashton. In a list of free tenants some 40 years later are recorded: William son of Lawrence, 2s. 6d; the same William, for Brantbreck, 1d; Alan de Ashton, 17 1/2d; John Ward, 2s. 6d; John, son of William the Clerk, 20d; Gervase del Green, 20d; Henry Alcok 5 1/2d; in all 14s. 6d.14

     Traces of the Lawrence estate in Ashton appear in inquisitions of some of the heirs, though the tenures are not always recorded. By some agreement, the manor descended through Boteler of Rawcliffe to Radcliff of Winmarleigh, and so my marriage to Gilbert Gerard woh purchase the other moiety from the Crown. Thus the whole became united in him and his descendants, the Gerards of Bromley and the Dukes of Hamilton. (Richard Skillecorne held part of it of the king in cocage in 1534. Thomas Regmaiden in 1520 held the reversion of the fourth part of the manor. John Boteler in 1534 held the manor of the king as duke in socage.) Sir Gilbert died in 1593 holding the manors of Ashton, Stodday, and Scotforth of the queen as of her crown of England in a fee farm by the hundredth part of a knight's fee and a rent of £16.11s. 4d.15

     King James I on his way from Scotland to London by Carlisle in 1617 arrived at Hornby, and thence went to Ashton Hall, where he knighted two gentlement on 11 Augus.16 In August 1648, the Duke of Hamilton stayed a night at Ashton Hall which was, in later years, to become inheritance of this family.17

     Ashton Hall was probably built by John's son Edmund. See Edmund Lawrence for additonal information.

Citations

  1. 1st Squire of Ashton.
  2. [S172] Schuyler Lawrence, Communication to NEHGS.
  3. [S272] William Farrer and J. Brownbill editors Victoria History of Lancastershire, Volume VIII, pages 38 & 51.
  4. [S173] Schuyler Lawrence, The Lawrences: Squires of Ashton, Lancs.
  5. [S272] William Farrer and J. Brownbill editors Victoria History of Lancastershire, Volume VII, page 189.
  6. [S272] William Farrer and J. Brownbill editors Victoria History of Lancastershire, Volume VIII, page 61.
  7. [S272] William Farrer and J. Brownbill editors Victoria History of Lancastershire, Volume VIII, page 51.
  8. [S272] William Farrer and J. Brownbill editors Victoria History of Lancastershire, Volume VII, page 257.
  9. [S272] William Farrer and J. Brownbill editors Victoria History of Lancastershire, Volume VIII, page 11.
  10. [S272] William Farrer and J. Brownbill editors Victoria History of Lancastershire, Volume VIII, page 70.
  11. [S176] Robert Means Lawrence M. D., Descendants of Major Samuel Lawrence.
  12. [S272] William Farrer and J. Brownbill editors Victoria History of Lancastershire, volume VIII, page 51.
  13. [S272] William Farrer and J. Brownbill editors Victoria History of Lancastershire, volume VIII, page 38.
  14. [S272] William Farrer and J. Brownbill editors Victoria History of Lancastershire, volime VIII, page 53.
  15. [S272] William Farrer and J. Brownbill editors Victoria History of Lancastershire, volume VII, page 52.
  16. [S272] William Farrer and J. Brownbill editors Victoria History of Lancastershire, volume VIII, page 16.
  17. [S272] William Farrer and J. Brownbill editors Victoria History of Lancastershire, volume VIII, page 17.

Elizabeth Holt1

#5735

Relationship7th great-grandmother of Robert Lawrence
ChartsRoger FitzReinfield Descendants
Descent from Roger FitzReinfrid to Robert Lawrence

Major Life Events

     Elizabeth Holt married John Lawrence, son of Lawrence de Lancaster.2,3

Children of Elizabeth and John Lawrence

Narrative

     Elizabeth is believed to have been surnamed Holt of the Stabley family.

Citations

  1. (of Stabley, Lancs.)
  2. [S172] Schuyler Lawrence, Communication to NEHGS.
  3. [S272] William Farrer and J. Brownbill editors Victoria History of Lancastershire, Volume VIII, pages 38 & 51.

William Lawrence1

#5736, d. before 1356

Relationships3rd great-grandson of Roger FitzReinfrid
7th great-granduncle of Robert Lawrence
ChartsRoger FitzReinfield Descendants
FatherLawrence de Lancaster b. s 1250, d. a 1317

Major Life Events

     He married the widow of Geoffrey de Curedale, Alice de Haydock, daughter of John de Haydock, circa 1314.2 William died before 1356.3

Child of William and Alice de Haydock

Narrative

     In 1324 an agreement was made between Sir Richard de Hoghton, William Lawrence and Alice his wife on one side and Lawrence Travers and his wife Aline on the other. Another agreement was made in 1330 between Sir Richard de Hoghton on the one side and Lawrence Travers and William Lawrence on the other as to the partition of certain meadows held by Avice de Howick. In 1324 Richard de Hoghton held a moiety of Ashton by the service of 5s. while Lawrence Travers and William Lawrence (in right of their wifes) held the other moiety by 5s. also.3

     In 1338 Adam son of Richard de Hoghton claimed a third part of the manor of Ashton as heir of Henry son of William de Lea. The holders were William Lawrence, Alice his wife, Lawrence Travers and Aline his wife. Alice and Aline being daughters of John brother of Robert de Haydock, whose rights, it was alleged was derived from a grant by William de Lea. Two years later Alan de Marhalgh, in right of his wife Isabel, claimed a fourth part of the manor of Ashton against Lawrence and Travers. The suit continued in 1345, Isabel being described as daughter of Adam son of Robert de Ashton. An agreement of 1339 represents Sir Richard and Sir Adam de Hoghton as recovering three parts of the manor from Alan de Marhalgh and Isabel his wife, while claims were put in by Lawrence, Travers, and Haydock.3

     In 1346, however, some readjustments had taken place, and while Sir Adam de Hoghton held a moiety of the manor (by the twelfth part of a knight's fee) he paid only 3s. 9d; Edmund de Haydock, Thomas Travers, and William Lawrence held a plough-land in socage by rents of 2s. 6d., 3s. 4d., and 5d., respectively. Thus the 10s. rent was contributed by four partners, three of whom held the 'plough-land' in socage while the other held a 'moiety of the manor' by knight's service.3

     In 1354, William and his wife made a settlement of their estate in Thornton, Great and Little Layton, a moiety of the manor of Ribbleton, and a fourth part of the manor of Ashton. The remainder, after their children John and others, as far as Ashton was concerned went to the right heirs of Alice; and Ribbleton to Joan, daughter of Geoffrey de Cuerdale for life. Joan was then the wife of Thomas de Molyneux and much of her estate went to the Osbaldeston family. This indicates that William had held Ribbleton in the right of his wife, Alice.4

     William was a member of Parliment and Steward to the Earl of Lancaster. He founded a family line seated at Ribbleton and Calughton.

     In 1356 Sir Adam de Hoghton claimed his part of the manor, alleging that John son of Thomas Travers, Alice widow of William Lawrence and Thomas son of Geoffrey de Hackinsall had occupied parts of it.3

Citations

  1. (of Ribbleton.)
  2. [S272] William Farrer and J. Brownbill editors Victoria History of Lancastershire, Volume VIII, pages 53 abd 270.
  3. [S272] William Farrer and J. Brownbill editors Victoria History of Lancastershire, Volume VII, page 133.
  4. [S272] William Farrer and J. Brownbill editors Victoria History of Lancastershire, Volume VII, page 106.

Alice Lawrence1,2,3

#5737

Relationships3rd great-granddaughter of Roger FitzReinfrid
7th great-grandaunt of Robert Lawrence
ChartsRoger FitzReinfield Descendants
FatherLawrence de Lancaster b. s 1250, d. a 1317

Narrative

     Alice never married and lived at Ashton Hall. She held two acres of land in 1332 obtained from Robert de Holland.

Citations

  1. (of Lancaster.)
  2. [S172] Schuyler Lawrence, Communication to NEHGS.
  3. [S272] William Farrer and J. Brownbill editors Victoria History of Lancastershire, Volume VIII, page 38.

Lawrence de Lancaster1

#5738, b. say 1250, d. after 1317

Relationships2nd great-grandson of Roger FitzReinfrid
8th great-grandfather of Robert Lawrence
ChartsRoger FitzReinfield Descendants
Descent from Roger FitzReinfrid to Robert Lawrence
FatherThomas de Lancaster b. s 1225, d. c 1292

Major Life Events

     Lawrence de Lancaster was born say 1250. Lawrence died after 1317.1

Children of Lawrence

Narrative

     The first mention of the family is in a suit in 1292 and 1302 where Lawrence de Lancaster sets forth his claim to 30 acres of land in Skerton. He was the brother and heir of John, son of Thomas, son of Roger de Lancaster.2 Lawrence complained that John le Gentyl and Agnes his wife were making waste in lands of his held as Agnes' dower. In 1323 the Millfield contained 20 acres and was held by tenants William and Randle le Gentyl, John and Alice Lawrence, and others.3

     In 1297 he held 30 acres in Skerton by a rent of 6s. 8d. which he had obtained from Nicholas Gentyl in 1292 who had held the land as trustee for Lawrence's brother John who had enfeoffed Nicholas.4 Also in 1297 there were three free tenants of Lune Mill, Lawrence son of Thomas de Lancaster, the Abbot of Furness, and Alan de Parles.5

     In 1301, Lawrence son of Thomas was one of the free tenants of the manors of Ashton and Scotforth. Some forty years later William son of Lawrence was listed as a free tenant.6

     In 1317 Lawrence son of Thomas de Lancaster granted lands in Skerton, Ashton, Brantbreck, Grisehead, &c. to his son John Lawrence and Elizabeth his wife. From this time on Lawrence was used as the family name.7

     Lawrence de Lancaster's three children, John, William, and Alice definitely were using the surname Lawrence. At various times in early records it was spelled Laurens, Laurenz, or Laurence.

Citations

  1. [S272] William Farrer and J. Brownbill editors Victoria History of Lancastershire, Volume VIII, pages 38 & 51.
  2. [S173] Schuyler Lawrence, The Lawrences: Squires of Ashton, Lancs.
  3. [S272] William Farrer and J. Brownbill editors Victoria History of Lancastershire, Volume VIII, page 38.
  4. [S272] William Farrer and J. Brownbill editors Victoria History of Lancastershire, Volume VIII, page 61.
  5. [S272] William Farrer and J. Brownbill editors Victoria History of Lancastershire, Volume VIII, page 59.
  6. [S272] William Farrer and J. Brownbill editors Victoria History of Lancastershire, Volume VIII, page 53.
  7. [S272] William Farrer and J. Brownbill editors Victoria History of Lancastershire, Volume VIII, page 51.

Thomas de Lancaster1

#5739, b. say 1225, d. circa 1292

RelationshipsGreat-grandson of Roger FitzReinfrid
9th great-grandfather of Robert Lawrence
ChartsRoger FitzReinfield Descendants
Descent from Roger FitzReinfrid to Robert Lawrence
FatherRoger de Lancaster b. s 1200, d. b 22 Feb 1290/91

Major Life Events

     Thomas de Lancaster was born say 1225. Thomas died circa 1292.

Children of Thomas

Narrative

     About 1247 the abbot and convent of Furness granted a toft to Thomas son of Roger de Lancaster in perpetual farm at 5s. rent; there was an oven on it.2 The estimated birth date of Thomas de Lancaster is based on this transaction. It would appear that Thomas may have been the eldest son of Roger de Lancaster, not a younger son as stated in The parentage of William de Lancaster, lord of Kendal by Washington.3 Thomas appears to have died circa 1292, about the same time as Roger de Lancaster or perhaps even before his father which may account for the lack of mention of Thomas as a heir of Roger. Also, was Thomas perhaps an illegitimate son of Roger, born before his marriage to Philippa de Bolebec?

     1274, Nicholas de la Quisine arraigns an assize against William de Stirkeland touching land in Sithereshergh; Dep. Keeper's Rep. 42, app. 653. Inquest taken at Kyrkeby in Kendale on Monday after the quindene of Holy Trinity, 2 Edward I (11 June, 1274) by the oath of Thomas de Lancaster, Richard Gilpin, John de Kenetemer, Roger de Bronolvesheved, Ralph de Patton, Thomas Collan, Benedice Gernet, Roger Kayrus, Robert de Stirkland, John de Midelton, Roger , son of William, William de Friysbank, and William son of Lexander, jurors, to make an extent of lands of Robert de Ros of Werk, who say that the castle of Kyrkeby in Kendale with the parks, vivaries, herbage and "cista" therein is worth one year with another ten marks; there are in Kirkeby in demesne 160 a. arable land, each worth yearly with meadow 6d. sum 66s. 7 d. (sic); the vill of Kirkeby with enclosure is worth 10 marks yearly; a water-mill, the moiety thereof pertaining to this part, with the moiety of the mills of Rispeton and Appeltweht, is worth 28 marks yearly, where of Alan de Sutton receives 50s. yearly and Adam de Lancastre 20s. for their lives; the moiety of the fulling-mill of Kirkeby, formerly extended at 10 marks, is now 8 marks, as the tenants of John de Bellewe ('de Bella Agua") in Kenetemere, who married Laderina, one of the sisters and heirs of Peter de Brus, do not suit at the said mill as of old in Peter's time; the moiety of the mill of Patton, formerly extended at 10 marks, is now 9 marks, as William de Wyndesores has set up a mill at Grarig to its injury in 1 mark yearly; the mill of the hospital is worth yearly 60s; the moiety of the mill at Dylaker is worth 10s yearly; the fishery of Fors is worth 6 marks; in the demesne of Helsinton there are 210 a. land with meadow, each worth 6d. yearly worth with the emendation of the grange, herbage of the hay with the forest and dead wood felled, £4 13. 4d; farm of the tenants in Helsinton, 64s. 10d; from geld ("goldor") of sheep there, 3s; farm of Henry the reeve of helsinton, 20s; the farm of Grenerig, 54s., and from "gold" there, 6s. 8d; farm of Adam de Riboyers, 6d; farm of Hagayl, £6 3s. and from "gold" there, 5s; from a meadow called Rispetun-henge, containing 9 a., 12 d. an acre yearly; from the herbage of Adam Brun, 16s. yearly; from the farm of William [le] Sauser, 3s 6d yearly; from that of Beauconquayte, 7s. yearly; from that of Stavley, 70s yearly and from the demesne there 46s. and from "goldis" there 6s. yearly; from a close at Hoon (?), 12d. yearly; from the farm of the vill of Stirkeland, 60s., and from "Golds" there, 3s; the meadow of Leythild, 6s. yearly; the farm of the vill of Schalquatrig, 50s. yearly; the farm of the tenants of the underwoods, 48s. the farm of Hotun, 110s. and from "golds" there, 6s; from the mill there, 100s; farm of the tenants in the forest with Schewreschale and Oxinhoime, £11 6s. 9d., herbage there 5 marks; from Adam son of Henry for a shieling and a 2 a. land, 3s; there are free tenants [in Kendale] who pay yearly £7 4s. 3d.' two year-old hawks, 2s; 2 pairs of gilt spurs, 13d; gloves, 1d; 6 cross bows 10d; 12 arrows 2d; 4 lbs. pepper, 40d; 4 lbs. cummin 4d;and 1 lb. wax, 6d; the forests of Ridale with Satsondoff and Becmelbrid and Carkerdale are worth £14 13s. 4d. yearly; the farm of Gresmere with a moiety of the mill and the fulling-mill, "goldarr" of sheep, moors, fishings and a brew-house, is worth £7 17s. 3d; the farm of Langedon with a moiety of the mill and herbage of the forest are worth £3 18s. 8½d; in Crostweyt there is land in demense worth 22s. 11d; the farm of Crostweyt with the herbage, "goldis," a brew-house and the mill are worth £11 15s. 11d. yearly; from the moiety of Aynerholm, 3s. 4d. yearly; from the farm of Adam Chefdor, 3s. yearly; Roger's island in Wynendemere is worth 12d. yearly; from small fishings above Kirkeby ½ mark; free tenants in Westmerland under 104s. 4d. yearly; the court of Kendale, worth one year with another and formerly extended at £20, is now worth £18, being reduced in value 40s by the purparty of John de Bellewe; from stallage, small herbages, pannage, honey and squirrels, 102s. Total £197 17s. 3½d. The said manor [of Kirkeby in Kendale] has fallen to the pourparty of Margaret de Ros, the last-born daughter and one of the heirs of Peter de Brus, and is held of the king in chief; Inq., p.m. 2 Edw. 1, n. 26.4

     Thomas de Lancaster had two sons, John de Lancaster, the heir, who had no issue, and Lawrence de Lancaster, the eventual heir.

Citations

  1. [S272] William Farrer and J. Brownbill editors Victoria History of Lancastershire, Volume VIII, pages 38 & 51.
  2. [S272] William Farrer and J. Brownbill editors Victoria History of Lancastershire, volume VIII, page 41.
  3. [S2379] "Parentage of William de Lancaster."
  4. [S2382] British History Online, online http://www.british-history.ac.uk/, 'Helsington and Sizergh', Records relating to the Barony of Kendale: volume 1 (1923) pp. 130-66.

Alice de Cuerdale

#5741, d. before 1353

ChartsRoger FitzReinfield Descendants
FatherJohn de Cuerdale
MotherDionisia ?

Major Life Events

     Alice de Cuerdale married Edmund Lawrence, son of John Lawrence and Elizabeth Holt.1 Alice died before 1353.2

Family of Alice and Edmund Lawrence

Citations

  1. [S272] William Farrer and J. Brownbill editors Victoria History of Lancastershire, Volume VI, page 301.
  2. [S272] William Farrer and J. Brownbill editors Victoria History of Lancastershire, Volume VIII, page 51.

John de Lancaster1

#5742, d. before 1292

Relationships2nd great-grandson of Roger FitzReinfrid
8th great-granduncle of Robert Lawrence
ChartsRoger FitzReinfield Descendants
FatherThomas de Lancaster b. s 1225, d. c 1292

Major Life Events

     John died without issue before 1292.1

Narrative

     In 1292, Lawrence de Lancaster claimed claimed the tenement of 30 acres in Skerton as heir of his brother John. It had evidently been held in trustee by Nicholas Gentyl.

Citations

  1. [S272] William Farrer and J. Brownbill editors Victoria History of Lancastershire, Volume VIII, pages 38 & 51.